Factors associated with pregnancy intention among women who have experienced a short birth interval: findings from the 2009 to 2011 Mississippi and 2009 Tennessee Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System.

TitleFactors associated with pregnancy intention among women who have experienced a short birth interval: findings from the 2009 to 2011 Mississippi and 2009 Tennessee Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsHuber LRBrunner, Smith K, Sha W, Zhao L, Vick T
JournalAnn Epidemiol
Volume28
Issue6
Pagination372-376
Date Published2018 Jun
ISSN1873-2585
Abstract

<p><b>PURPOSE: </b>One-third of all pregnancies in the United States are conceived within 18 months of a prior live birth. Preventing unintended pregnancies may help to decrease the prevalence of pregnancies with these short interpregnancy intervals. However, data on factors associated with pregnancy intention among women who have had short birth intervals are sparse. Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System data were used to further evaluate these associations.</p><p><b>METHODS: </b>Because only Mississippi and Tennessee Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System include a survey question about birth interval length, this analysis was limited to women from those states who recently had a short birth interval (n = 384). Pregnancy intention and demographic, lifestyle, and reproductive data were obtained from surveys and birth certificates. Logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).</p><p><b>RESULTS: </b>Nearly 76% of women with short birth intervals reported their pregnancy as unintended. Women who were non-Hispanic black or consumed alcohol during pregnancy had statistically significant increased odds of reporting the pregnancy with a short birth interval as being unintended (OR = 3.98; 95% CI: 1.73-9.16 and OR = 10.56; 95% CI: 1.80-61.83, respectively).</p><p><b>CONCLUSIONS: </b>Although all women should be counseled on postpartum contraceptive use, findings suggest that important subpopulations of women may benefit from more targeted counseling during prenatal care visits and the immediate postpartum hospital stay regarding the importance of using contraception to not only better space pregnancies but also prevent unintended pregnancies.</p>

DOI10.1016/j.annepidem.2018.03.012
Alternate JournalAnn Epidemiol
PubMed ID29653799