Genetic analysis of glucosinolate variability in broccoli florets using genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms.

TitleGenetic analysis of glucosinolate variability in broccoli florets using genome-anchored single nucleotide polymorphisms.
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2015
AuthorsBrown AF, Yousef GG, Reid RW, Chebrolu KK, Thomas A, Krueger C, Jeffery E, Jackson E, Juvik JA
JournalTheor Appl Genet
Volume128
Issue7
Pagination1431-47
Date Published2015 Jul
ISSN1432-2242
KeywordsBrassica, Chromosome Mapping, Chromosomes, Plant, DNA, Plant, Flowers, Genetic Linkage, Genetic Markers, Glucosinolates, Phenotype, Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide, Quantitative Trait Loci, Vegetables
Abstract

<p><b>KEY MESSAGE: </b>The identification of genetic factors influencing the accumulation of individual glucosinolates in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of glucosinolate levels in Brassica vegetables and will accelerate the development of vegetables with glucosinolate profiles tailored to promote human health. Quantitative trait loci analysis of glucosinolate (GSL) variability was conducted with a B. oleracea (broccoli) mapping population, saturated with single nucleotide polymorphism markers from a high-density array designed for rapeseed (Brassica napus). In 4 years of analysis, 14 QTLs were associated with the accumulation of aliphatic, indolic, or aromatic GSLs in floret tissue. The accumulation of 3-carbon aliphatic GSLs (2-propenyl and 3-methylsulfinylpropyl) was primarily associated with a single QTL on C05, but common regulation of 4-carbon aliphatic GSLs was not observed. A single locus on C09, associated with up to 40 % of the phenotypic variability of 2-hydroxy-3-butenyl GSL over multiple years, was not associated with the variability of precursor compounds. Similarly, QTLs on C02, C04, and C09 were associated with 4-methylsulfinylbutyl GSL concentration over multiple years but were not significantly associated with downstream compounds. Genome-specific SNP markers were used to identify candidate genes that co-localized to marker intervals and previously sequenced Brassica oleracea BAC clones containing known GSL genes (GSL-ALK, GSL-PRO, and GSL-ELONG) were aligned to the genomic sequence, providing support that at least three of our 14 QTLs likely correspond to previously identified GSL loci. The results demonstrate that previously identified loci do not fully explain GSL variation in broccoli. The identification of additional genetic factors influencing the accumulation of GSL in broccoli florets provides novel insight into the regulation of GSL levels in Brassicaceae and will accelerate development of vegetables with modified or enhanced GSL profiles.</p>

DOI10.1007/s00122-015-2517-x
Alternate JournalTheor. Appl. Genet.
PubMed ID25930056